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Add a Stove-side Pot Filler to Your Kitchen

If you do a lot of stovetop cooking, carrying pots and pans back and forth between your stove and your kitchen sink can be a hassle. Not only is it time consuming to fill a large pot, but once it is full, it’s incredibly heavy and cumbersome to carry, not to mention prone to spilling. A pot filler faucet can change this with a single renovation, giving you the ability to fill pots of any size directly on your stovetop.

What makes this type of faucet special is the long and movable arm reach that your typical faucet lacks (by Precision Homecrafters, LLC)

Well, what is a pot filler? It’s a special faucet type that differs from other types of kitchen faucets by having an extendable handle that can be adjusted to reach out farther and higher than its counterparts. That means, you guessed it, it can accommodate large and tall pots that are normally hard to fill inside your sink. They come in a variety of styles that fit every kitchen, and only require some re-piping in your kitchen walls to insert and use over the stove.

Sink full of dishes? Bypass that mess and still fill up your pots with ease by using a secondary kitchen faucet (by Karen Viscito Interiors)

Having a pot filler means you don’t need to fight with the sink to fit your pots in order to fill them under a normal-shaped faucet. Normally, if you have dirty dishes in your sink, you can forget about trying to fill your cooking pot in a way that doesn’t spill or crash dishes everywhere. But a pot filler faucet is out of the way from your regular sink messes and so doesn’t affect your cooking (unless you’re like me and also stack dishes on the stove). Even if you do keep a bit of a messy kitchen, the folding design of most pot fillers means they can sit flat against your wall – and totally out of your way – when you aren’t using them.

Skip using your kitchen sink with a wall-mounted pot filler to directly fill your pots for cooking (by Amoroso Design)

The nice thing I find about pot fillers is that they can be mounted in more than one location. If you don’t have a big, roomy backsplash, they can also be deck-mounted (aka, coming out of your countertop behind or to either side of your range). Again because they can be adjusted, you’ll still be able to get the full use out of them even if your installation is a little less conventional. That means no half-filled pots of water, dumping water into your sink while you struggle to get the pot back out, or carrying a heavy pot of water across the length of your kitchen while leaving your cooking area unattended.

If you don’t want to tear out a wall for installation, running your plumbing through nearby cabinetry is a more affordable way to install a pot filler (by KBG Design)

However, this convenience does come at the cost of tearing out part of your wall and installing piping there in order to run water to your stove, which can be pricey depending on how much of your wall you plan to open up (and how far away your existing plumbing is from your stove). As I mentioned, running the plumbing through your cabinets and up through your counter tops can be a little less expensive. There is also the option to replace your regular kitchen faucet with a pot filler instead, which provides fewer of the benefits, but also without any re-piping required.

Though aptly named a pot filler for its main use, you can find many other times to use your secondary faucet in the kitchen once you have one (by Moen)

Why should you get one? Well, if you’re big into cooking large pot meals the appeal should be obvious. Once a luxury limited to commercial kitchens, pot filler faucets are now a popular choice for the home. A secondary source of water in the kitchen is also nice to have, especially with multiple cooks in the kitchen. Whether it’s filling the dehumidifier or the dog bowl, there are a ton of odd-shaped objects that are a pain to fill under your normal faucet that would be easy with a pot filler.