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Vintage Style Faucets for a Traditional Kitchen

The last time I talked about kitchen remodeling and luxury faucets, I kept a firm focus on the more modern end of the spectrum. Newer, slicker models to match contemporary kitchens. This time I thought I’d take a look at the more retro faucet options, just in case modern isn’t exactly your style. Vintage or farmhouse kitchens tend to have a more cozy, homey feel than your average contemporary kitchen. Luxury doesn’t have to equal cutting-edge, and just because something looks old-fashioned doesn’t mean it isn’t a great investment. Bring a bit of nostalgia to your kitchen with these styles and tips.

The bridge faucet is a popular style for vintage and farmhouse sinks. By Kitchen Kraft.
The bridge faucet is a popular style for vintage and farmhouse sinks. By Kitchen Kraft.

One of the most popular old fashioned or ‘vintage’ style faucets is the bridge style, so named because the handles are joined to the faucet by a low connecting pipe. The 90-degree angles and decorative renderings give it a turn-of-the-century feel. Unlike more modern designs, a lot of traditional faucets have two handles instead of one. It’s twice as many levers to deal with, but it also allows for much more precise control over temperature.

Double Handle Kitchen Faucet, 4202 by Herbeau
Double Handle Kitchen Faucet, 4202 by Herbeau

If you do decide to go the route of the two-handed sink, keep in mind that instillation will require three holes at minimum, for connecting the faucet to a water source. Four, if your faucet also comes with a dish-sprayer. If your sink is lacking, it isn’t an automatic deal-breaker–it just means instillation will require another step. Two-handled faucets come in a wide range of options, so if the bridge style doesn’t do it for you, don’t panic. There are still gooseneck faucets that don’t look like they belong in a space ship, as well as some good all-around designs, if you’re looking for something that isn’t too ostentatious or eye-catching.

Estelle Collection Wall-Mounted Single Handle Kitchen Faucet 4109 by Herbeau
Estelle Collection Wall-Mounted Single Handle Kitchen Faucet 4109 by Herbeau

On the other hand, if you are looking for something really distinctive, you could go for one of the many antique reproductions on the market. These kinds of faucets wouldn’t look out of place on an episode of Downton Abbey, and would really make your kitchen stand out as unique. And depending on the placement of your sink and the position of the holes, a wall-mounted faucet can be a good way to go. They save counter space, although for colder climates beware that pipes freeze more easily this way.

Vintage III Bridge Faucet WHKBTCR3-9201 by Whitehaus
Vintage III Bridge Faucet WHKBTCR3-9201 by Whitehaus

Color and material are also important factors to consider when you go about investing in a traditional style sink. Certain materials definitely say ‘vintage’ more than others. Brass and nickel are both commonly used, and many faucets also come with a choice of finish, so you have ultimate control over how the final product looks.

One-handled sinks can also fit an elegant, vintage kitchen. By Eclectic Kitchen.
One-handled sinks can also fit an elegant, vintage kitchen. By Eclectic Kitchen.

Don’t want to go the two-handled route, and don’t feel like dealing with drilling a couple new holes into your sink? No fear. There are traditional style one-handled faucets as well. If you go for decorative rather than sleek, most things will fit into a vintage-style kitchen.

Just like with a contemporary kitchen, there are countless designs to choose from, and dozens of ways to make your new faucet work with your decor. Sinks are such integral parts of any kitchen remodel that it’s worth it to spend some time deciding exactly how and how much you are going to be using your sink, as well as figuring out the structural limitations of your space. Then go forth! Let there be water.